Chimichurri surf and turf

Featured


Chimichurri surf and turf is the perfect meal for sharing with a table of friends and family and it really does take very little effort. The quantities of steak and prawns are merely a guide so adjust according to appetite! The chimichurri can be made in advance, covered and stored in the fridge until you need it. Chimichurri should have a kick whilst still being able to taste the herbs and other ingredients so aim for a perfect balance. Use the best prawns you can find and afford as the flavour will be unrivalled. Eating shell on prawns can be a fun but messy affair so provide finger bowls for your guests too.

img_20160930_074458

Ingredients- serves 4
Small bunch of fresh flatleaf parsley
Small bunch of fresh coriander
2 garlic cloves
1 shallot
1 fresh red chilli
4-5 tbsp olive oil plus extra for cooking
Juice of half a lemon
2 tsp red wine vinegar
2-3 sirloin steaks
16-20 tiger prawns- raw and shell on
Salad leaves to serve- I used rocket, spinach and watercress

1. To make the chimichurri, blitz the parsley, garlic, shallot, chilli, oil, lemon and vinegar in a processor so grab your pestle and mortar and give it a good old bash! Set aside until ready to use.

2. When you are ready to cook the steak, take a griddle pan and heat until smoking hot. Season and lightly oil the meat and cook to your liking. I allow 1 minutes each side for your average size sirloin for rare but cook according to your tastes. Remove from the pan and allow to rest.

3. Whilst the steak is resting, cook the prawns. Take a frying pan and heat a glug of oil. Cook the prawns until pink and cooked through. Use some of the chimichurri and toss well to coat the prawns. When the steak is ready, cut into slices. Take a large serving platter and scatter the salad leaves. Place the steak on the platter and spoon over some of the chimichurri before arranging the prawns around. Finish off with more of the chimichurri and serve immediately.

Chimichurri surf and turf- a treat fit for any occasion!

Scallop and cherry tomato tagliatelle

Sometimes ingredients are so fresh and delicious that very little needs doing with them in order to make a memorable dish that you will cook time and time again- this is one of those dishes! if you regularly read my recipes you will have worked out that I love seafood in its many guises and scallops are no exception. Sweet, tender and succulent scallops need to be paired with simple, clean flavours so you can appreciate their beauty. I have paired a classic base of garlic, a little chilli and sweet tomatoes to allow each flavour to sing.

To make this even more accessible, I have used bay scallops which tend to be easy to find and a little cheaper than their larger sea scallop counterparts. If, however, you do want to use the larger ones then go ahead. This is also quick to do so there is no excuse to pick up the takeaway menu after a day at work so read on and get cooking!

IMG_20160515_203240

Ingredients- serves 2
200g bay scallops
Glug of olive oil
1 garlic clove- crushed or finely chopped
1 red chilli- deseeded and finely chopped
200g cherry tomatoes- halved
60ml dry white wine
Handful of fresh basil leaves- roughly torn
30g unsalted butter
150g tagliatelle

1. Kick off by getting your pans at the ready- you will need a pan for the pasta so boil a kettle and bring the water to the boil. You will also need a pan that the sauce can simmer away in and one for pan frying the scallops. To make the sauce, simply heat a glug of oil over a medium heat and cook the garlic and chilli until softening, but make sure the garlic does not catch colour.

2. Throw in the halved cherry tomatoes and the white wine; simmer until the wine is reduced by half. Keep the tomatoes cooking away until the they reduce and the juice starts to make a sauce. Keep this on low. Meanwhile cook the pasta according to the packet instructions; drain well and set aside.

3. As the pasta cooks, take the remaining pan and heat the butter and a splash of oil over a medium to high heat. Pan fry the scallops until they are golden on the outside which usually takes a couple of minutes on each side but do keep an eye on them so they don’t overcook. As the sauce is finishing, add in the torn basil before tossing the pan fried scallops through so they are lightly coated in the sauce. Add in the drained pasta and serve!

 

Asparagus, feta and mint frittata

Featured

This time of year brings the end of the asparagus season so cue me raiding the shops and markets for what’s left in an attempt to hold onto this glorious British grown vegetable. Green, white and purple- you can’t beat asparagus in all its splendour and each with different flavour profiles so you can choose your favourite.

Frittata is perfect for a light summer lunch or dinner. I have chosen to add Jersey Royal potatoes as well to add another flavour and texture so all you need to do is serve the frittata with a salad and away you go! The frittata is also brilliant the next day when chilled overnight and then served at room temperature which makes it perfect for a make ahead picnic idea.

IMG_20160623_200607

Ingredients- serves 4
300g new potatoes
Glug of olive oil
1 banana shallot- finely sliced
6 large eggs- lightly beaten and seasoned
200g asparagus
100g feta
Handful of fresh mint- finely chopped

1. Boil a kettle of water and simmer the new potatoes for a few minutes until just tender. Drain and set aside, allowing them to cool until you can handle them. Slice them into thin rounds and place in a large bowl.

2. In a frying pan that is going to be large enough to hold the eggs, potatoes and asparagus, add a glug of oil and gently fry the shallot until softened. Depending on the size of the asparagus you have, cut them into chunks and if they are particularly thick then you can also cut these lengthways. If the asparagus is a little more woody (as it can be at the end of the season) you may like to blanch it for a minute or so before using it.

3. To the bowl with the potatoes, add the beaten eggs, asparagus and most of the feta along with the mint. Gently mix to combine and add into the pan with the shallot. Sprinkle the frittata with the remaining feta. Increase the heat to medium and cook until set. Towards the end of cooking, fire up your grill and pop the pan underneath to melt the feta until golden. Serve with a salad.

Asparagus, feta and mint frittata- a frittata fit for picnics across the land this summer!

Prawn laksa


Prawn laksa hits all the right flavour notes- spicy, savoury and a hint of sweetness; surely it has to be one of the best Asian comfort foods around? Laksa is usually found in Malaysia and can include many main ingredients such as chicken or tofu- prawn is just the start or you can always mix and match! Don’t be put off by the shrimp paste or fish sauce- they are there to season and add depth so do try them. The spice paste can be made well in advance and then kept in the fridge. You may also like to make more paste than you need for one meal and then save it for another day to save some time.

This laksa includes beansprouts which are readily available in supermarkets. You may also like to include shredded vegetables such as mange tout, sugar snap peas or Asian greens- it really depends how hungry you are!

IMG_20160517_192418

Ingredients- serves 2
For the laksa paste
2 dried kashmiri chillies- soaked then chopped
1 stem of lemongrass- chopped
2 cloves of garlic
1 inch piece of fresh ginger
1 tsp shrimp paste
2 shallots- chopped
Pinch of turmeric
Salt
1/2 tbsp vegetable oil

For the rest
200g raw prawns
400ml coconut milk
200ml chicken stock made up with water
1 tbsp fish sauce
1/2 tbsp palm sugar
150g rice noodles
50g beansprouts
2 spring onions- shredded

1. Start off by soaking the kashmiri chillies whilst you prepare the remaining ingredients for the paste. Blitz into a paste or bash using a mortar and pestle if you prefer a more rustic look.

2. Take a large pan and heat the glug of vegetable oil over a medium heat. Cook off the paste for a couple of minutes until it releases its fragrance. Add the coconut milk, stock, fish sauce and palm sugar and simmer. How long I simmer this for depends on how much time I have but aim for around 10-15 minutes so the flavours from the paste has time to develop and infuse.

3. Meanwhile soak the rice noodles in boiling water, drain well and set aside. Pop the prawns into the broth to cook through whilst you divide the noodles between two deep bowls. Alternatively, and I know this is not the true way of doing it, but I also like to add the rice noodles to the broth and finish off in that so it soaks up the fragrant sauce. When the prawns are cooked, ladle the broth over the noodles before going in with the beansprouts and spring onion. I also like to fry rings of shallot to give a crispy topping.

Prawn laksa- spicy, warming, comforting and impossible to resist!

Caramelised balsamic shallot tarte tatin

If you think of a tarte tatin, people will conjure up images of deliciously sweet and syrupy apple desserts however think again! This tarte tatin is savoury, moreish and there’s not a single apple in sight. I have previously made an onion tarte tatin however you just can’t beat the softeness of the shallot with its gentle flavour which goes perfectly with the tartness of the balsamic and the savouriness of the pastry. Balsamic and thyme is a match made in heaven so I have included this in the caramel and also sprinkled some more leaves over the top to finish. I used normal shallots however banana shallot will also work well.

Readymade puff pastry sheets tend to be quite large and may need cutting down. You will need to make sure the pastry round is slightly larger than the pan itself so the pastry can be tucked in snuggly.

IMG_20160510_195321

Ingredients- makes one tart which serves 2 for dinner
400g shallots
25g butter
1 tbsp balsamic
1 tbsp brown sugar
Salt
Few sprigs of fresh thyme
1 premade puff pastry sheet

1. Double check the instructions on the puff pastry you buy but otherwise preheat the oven to 200c/ 180 fan ready for action shortly. In the meantime, boil a kettle of water and pour into a heat proof bowl that is large enough to hold the shallots. Soak the shallots for 10 minutes before removing, allowing to cool and then peeling them. Carefully cut the shallots in half from end to end so they stay together as best as they can and set aside.

2. Take a frying pan that is around 22cm in diameter. Heat the butter, sugar and balsamic vinegar along with the leaves from several fresh thyme sprigs. Season lightly. Place the shallots cut side down in the pan. Cook on the hob over a low to medium heat until the shallots start to soften which will take around 10 minutes. Don’t be tempted to cook them on a high heat otherwise the balsamic mixture will burn. You will find the balsamic reduces down a bit which is what you want.

3. Take the puff pastry sheet and gently lay it across the top of the shallots. Tuck the sides in so they hug the shallots and cook in the oven for around 20 minutes until golden and cooked through. You can tell if it needs a little longer as pastry may look paler in places. When cooked, remove the pan from the oven and get ready to turn it out. Lay a board or serving plate across the top of the pan and turn it over. If the pastry needs a little hand then use a knife and run it around the edge to help loosen it. Be careful not to burn yourself on the hot pan or with the hot juices. If a shallot or two is stuck to the bottom of the pan, gently coax it off and pop back in its rightful place. Serve with a simple salad.

Balsamic and thyme shallot tart tatin- a savoury twist on a French classic!

 

Prawn and squash red Thai curry

When life gives you plenty of frozen king prawns and leftover butternut squash then the answer is to use them to create a beautifully fragrant Thai curry. Now for a word about the curry paste: yes, the ingredients list does look lengthy but it really is worth the effort! The paste can be made in large quantities ahead of time and then kept in the fridge. You will need the equivalent of around 2 tbsp worth of paste if you are cooking this for 2 people and simply double the amount for 4.

IMG_20160314_191656

Ingredients- serves 2
200g raw peeled king prawns- deveined
Half a small butternut squash- cut into bite sized chunks
300ml coconut milk
100ml chicken stock

For the red curry paste
6 whole dried red chillies
1 tbsp coriander seeds
2 tsp cumin seeds
1 1/2 tbsp galangal- chopped finely
1 tbsp lemonsgrass- chopped finely
1 tsp peppercorns
5 garlic cloves- finely grated
1 inch piece of fresh ginger- finely grated
2 shallots- finely chopped
1 lime- zest finely grated
2 tbsp fish sauce
2 tbsp vegetable oil
1/2 tsp salt

1. Start off by making the curry paste by toasting the coriander and cumin seeds in a small pan over a medium heat. As the spices start to release their fragrance, remove from the heat and set aside to cool slightly before grinding in a spice grinder or pestle and mortar. Add the rest of the ingredients and combine to form a thick paste.

2. Heat a small amount of vegetable or groundnut oil in a wok or wide frying pan and fry off the curry paste for a couple of minutes. Add the coconut milk and stock and stir well to combine. Increase the heat and bring to the boil before lowering to a simmer. I covered the pan and simmered it for around half an hour so it begins to reduce down and gives the flavours time to the flavours develop.

3. The chunks of butternut squash will take around 10 minutes for bite sized pieces so pop them in when you’re ready and simmer until almost tender. Check the chunks by piercing them with a knife; if it sinks in easily then it is ready! Towards the end of cooking, add in the prawns and simmer until they are cooked through. Serve the curry immediately with some extra chopped red chilli or a little freshly chopped coriander if you like and dig in. This is also delicious with sticky Thai rice which is easily accessible in supermarkets now.

King prawn and squash red curry- delicate, fragrant and oh so delicious so get cooking!

 

Thai beef panang curry

Thai beef panang is a great introduction to cooking Thai at home. It tends to be milder than a lot of Thai curries but can easily be adjusted if you prefer a bit more fire in your curries! Other meats, or even, tofu can be used in place of beef however this stands up the spices well so do give it a go. Peanut is included in this recipe as it traditionally is- remember it is important to find plain peanuts and not ones that have been already salted or roasted.

IMG_20151118_193110-1

Ingredients- serves 4
Vegetable oil
400ml coconut milk
3 tbsp fish sauce
2 tbsp palm sugar
Handful of pea aubergines or chopped baby aubergines
Few kaffir lime leaves- deveined and chopped
4 minute steaks
1- 2 red finger chilli peppers- deseeded and finely chopped

For the spice paste

2 tsp coriander seeds
2 tsp cumin seeds
2 tsp coarse sea salt
Few peppercorns
3 dried red finger chillies- soaked in water until softened
1 piece of fresh lemongrass- finely chopped
1 banana shallot- finely chopped
3 garlic cloves- chopped
Small piece of galangal- finely sliced
1 1/2 tbsp shelled plain peanuts
Few kaffir lime leave- deveined and finely chopped
2 tsp shrimp paste

1.You can make the curry paste well in advance to save you time later; it stores well in the fridge too. Take a small pan and dry fry the coriander and cumin seeds for a couple of minutes over a medium heat until the spices start to release their fragrance.

2. Place the toasted spices and all the other ingredients, apart from the shrimp paste, in a small processor or pestle and mortar and blitz until they form a paste. The shrimp paste needs to be cooked before adding to the mix so it doesn’t taste as strong. do this by taking a small piece of kitchen foil and loosely wrapping the shrimp paste in it; cook in a dry frying pan for a minute before adding to the spice paste and combining well.

3. When you are ready to make the curry, take a large pan and heat a glug of vegetable oil over a medium heat. Take the curry paste you have made already and fry for a few minutes until the flavours begin to be released. Pour in the coconut milk and add the before bringing to the boil. Add in the pea or baby aubergines, kaffir lime leaves and palm sugar and simmer for around 10 minutes to allow the spices develop and the sugar dissolves.

4. Keep the pan on low and add strips of minute steak; they will cook in a few minutes in the curry so keep an eye on them. When the beef is done to your liking, divide the curry between four bowls and top with fresh red chilli or extra peanut (adjust according to taste). Serve with jasmine rice.

Classic beef panang curry- bursting with flavour to wake up your tastebuds!