Spicy, sticky Korean chicken drumsticks

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Spicy Korean chicken is the ultimate in Asian comfort food. Sweet, spicy and savoury flavours make them one of the most moreish dishes which is perfect for a quiet night in or a party with friends. Just be prepared for them to go down a storm so make more than one batch! Allow a little time for the chicken to marinade in the fridge before you need them so the flavours have time to infuse. The recipe can easily be multiplied depending on how many guests you are feeding and can be used for a whole range of chicken pieces from drumsticks to thighs to wings so get cooking!

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Ingredients- makes 12 drumsticks
12 chicken drumsticks
60ml dark soy sauce
3 tbsp runny honey
2 tbsp rice wine vinegar
2 tbsp gochujang

1. Crack on with the marinade in advance by simply combining the soy, honey, rice wine vinegar and gochujang. Simple! Place in a bowl or in a zip lock freezer bag along with the chicken pieces and make sure they are well coated. Chill in the fridge until you need them. A couple of hours is good but overnight is even better if time allows.

2. When you are ready to cook them, they will take around 20-25 minutes in the oven on 200c/ 180 fan. Make sure the chicken is cooked through and the juices should run clear when it is ready. Reserve the marinade and place in a small pan on the hob and gently heat until it begins to thicken. When it is ready brush the chicken drumsticks with the thickened sauce on each side before giving one last minute in the oven. You can also finish them off with a sprinkle of toasted sesame seeds if you like. The marinade makes the chicken deliciously sticky and irresistible. That’s all there is to it!

Spicy Korean chicken drumsticks- grab a pile of napkins and dive in!

 

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Kimchi rice bowl with braised pork and prawn

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After recently restocking my supplies of kimchi I thought it was only right that this kimchi rice with prawns and braised pork belly took pride of place on the dining table. Kimchi is the national dish of Korea and has become much easier to get hold of in recent years.

The key to cooking the rice is to prepare it ahead of time so it has plenty of time to cool before stir frying to reheat. This will give you rice that is fluffy without being stodgy. I cover the rice with water and then bring to a boil before simmering with the lid on for ten minutes. Remove from the heat and leave the lid on so it steams. You’ll get perfect rice every time!

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Ingredients- serves 2-3
For the pork
2 generous slices of belly pork
1 tbsp vegetable oil
1 tbsp sugar
1 tbsp gochujang paste
1 tbsp dark soy
1 tsp rice wine vinegar
1 garlic clove- crushed
1/2 tbsp runny honey
400ml water

For the rice
300g white rice- cooked and cooled
Glug of groundnut oil
50g kimchi- shredded if in larger pieces
1/2 tbsp gochujang paste
Bunch of spring onions- half shredded, half kept whole
1 tbsp sesame seeds
200g raw king prawns

1. Start by preparing the pork belly. Cut the pork into bite sized pieces. Bring a pan of water to the boil and cook the pork for 2 minutes before removing from the pan with a slotted spoon. Drain the water and dry the pan before placing it back on the hob over a medium heat.

2. Add the vegetable oil and dissolve the sugar into it. Pop the boiled pork into the pan and cook until golden; this may take a good few minutes so don’t rush it. Combine the gochujang, soy, rice wine vinegar, garlic and honey and add to the pan; stir well to coat the pork before adding the water. Cover the pan with a lid and simmer for an hour until the pork is meltingly tender and the sauce is reduced. Towards the end of cooking you may like to remove the lid to help it reduce even more.

3. Next up goes the rice base for the dish. Get going by heating a large wok or frying pan and popping in a little groundnut oil over a medium heat. Add in the kimchi and garlic and cook for a minute before adding the gochujang. Half of the spring onions need to be shredded and added into the pan next before tossing the cooled rice through to heat. Add the pork chunks back into the pan along with the prawns and stir through, cooking until the prawns are cooked through. Sprinkle in the sesame seeds before serving. Lightly trim the remaining spring onions and oil before griddling and serving on top of the rice.

Kimchi rice bowl with prawn and braised pork belly- a delicious introduction to Korean cuisine!

 

Sticky, sweet and spicy Chinese style ribs

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When you fancy a Chinese takeaway the lure of the ribs on the menu tends to be strong… well at least in my mind anyway. Try making your own so you can make them as sweet, savoury or as spicy as you want- or all three! A rack of pork ribs is inexpensive and an average sized rack feeds two people so it’s a bargain! Keep your eyes out for a rack that has plenty of meat on it as some can be a little scrawny and that only brings disappointment rather than pure porky joy!

If you cast your eye down the list of ingredients you will notice that one of them is not Chinese, but Korean: gochujang. When I was putting the marinade together I thought what would give a deep chilli flavour but stand up to the other ingredients so it was settled.

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Ingredients- serves 4
2 racks of pork ribs
120ml oyster or hoisin sauce
60ml dark soy sauce
1 tbsp rice wine vinegar
3 tbsp dark brown sugar
2 tbsp runny honey
1 tbsp gochujang
2 cm piece fresh ginger- grated
2 garlic cloves- crushed
1 tbsp ground five spice

1. Ideally the ribs would have around 3 hours in the fridge marinating but overnight is perfect if you have a bit more time. Simply mix together all the ingredients in a bowl and pour most of the marinade over the racks. Cover and place in the fridge to marinate.

2. When you are ready to cook the ribs, preheat the oven to 160c/ 140 fan. Wrap the racks of ribs in foil parcels and make sure they are tightly sealed. Cook in the oven for around 3 hours (depending on the size of the racks). After this time the racks should be tender and flexible so you know they are nearly all set.

3. For the last step, turn up the oven to 200c/ 180 fan. Peel back the foil and brush the last of the marinade over the ribs and cook for a further 10- 15 minutes until sticky and unctuous. Use a knife to separate the ribs and grab a stack of napkins (you’ll need them!); serve the ribs immediately.

Chinese takeaway style ribs- let’s face it, there’s no elegant way to eat these but dive in!

Asian spicy braised pork belly

Who can resist the tenderness of pork belly, the umami flavour of Asian ingredients and the punch of chilli in a recipe? Certainly not me! This sticky braised pork belly takes inspiration from Asia to give a straightforward meal idea that everyone can achieve.

This recipe cannot necessarily be pinned down to one specific Asian cuisine but I have mixed and matched my favourite ingredients to give the perfect balance of flavour. I have used gochujang which is a spicy paste made from fermented soya beans. You can buy this online at http://www.souschef.co.uk or find it at your local Asian supermarkets if you have one.

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Ingredients- serves 2-3 
300g lean pork belly
2 tablespoons oil
1 tablespoon sugar
3 tablespoons sake or shaoxing wine
1 tablespoon light soy sauce
1 tablespoon dark soy sauce
1 tablespoon gochujang (Korean chilli paste)
450ml water

1.To begin, cut the pork belly into inch sized pieces. Bring a pan of water to the boil and blanch the pork belly chunks for 2 minutes to draw out any impurities before removing from the pan with a slotted spoon and setting aside.

2. Heat a wok over a low to medium heat and add in the oil and sugar. Cook until the sugar is melting before adding the pork chunks. Cook until the pork is beginning to turn golden- remember to brown off on each side of the pork chunks for an even colour and flavour.

3. At this stage, lower the temperature of the wok back to low and add in both kinds of soy sauce, the sake or shaoxing wine (whichever you are using) and water. Cover the wok with a lid and simmer the pork for approximately 1 hour 30 minutes to 1 hour 45 minutes until the pork belly is meltingly tender. Remember to check the pork from time to time during the cooking process and add a splash more water if it starting to stick to the pan or becoming too dry. If, at the end of the cooking, you have excess sauce then simply remove the lid of the wok, increase the heat slightly and reduce so it ends up being a glossy, sticky glaze over the pork and that’s all there is to it! Serve with rice and Asian greens if you like and dig in!

Asian inspired sticky braised pork belly- a recipe you will come back to time and time again!