Korean chicken wings with slaw

Featured

Spicy Korean chicken really is a thing of beauty and indulgence but it can often be heavy as, more often than not, it’s deep-fried which does nothing for the waistline so this version is still just as moreish but a little better on the health front! Gochujang and gochugaru are Korean ingredients are becoming more accessible in the UK so it’s time to raid your local Asian supermarket to source the best ingredients that you can. The chilli paste, gochujang, and the chilli powder, gochugaru, are spicy but full of flavour. I have paired the chicken with a simple, light slaw. This really is the perfect meal to share with friends or to make for a lazy weekend dinner. On the off chance that there are any leftovers the chicken wings are also delicious cold the next day for a quick snack.

Ingredients- serves 4
For the chicken
Approx. 700g chicken wings
3 tbsps gochujang
1 tsp gochugaru
3 garlic cloves
2 tbsps soy
1/2 tbsp rice wine vinegar
1 tbsp sugar
2 tbsps water
1 tbsp toasted sesame seeds
Spring onion

For the slaw
1/2 head each of red and white cabbage
1 large carrot
3 spring onions
2 tbsps gochugaru
2 tbsps fish sauce
1 tbsp sugar
Juice from 1/2 a lime
2 garlic cloves- grated
1 tbsp toasted sesame seeds
1 tbsp sesame oil

1. Get going with the chicken marinade in advance of when you want to cook them so the chicken takes on as much flavour from the marinade as possible. Simply combine all the ingredients apart from the toasted sesame seeds and spring onion. Place in a large bowl with the chicken wings, cover, pop in the fridge and set aside- ideally overnight but for at least an hour.

2. In the meantime the slaw can be made. Use a mandolin or sharp knife and finely shred the red and white cabbage. Grate the carrot and finely slice the spring onion. Add all the other ingredients together in a bowl and stir well to combine before pouring over the vegetable mix; toss well so it all gets an even coating.

3. When you are ready to cook the chicken, preheat the oven to 200c/ 180 fan. Place the marinated chicken in a large baking tray and cook for around 20 minutes or until the chicken is cooked through and the juices run clear.

4. To assemble, take a large serving platter and arrange the slaw. Top with the cooked wings, sprinkle over the toasted sesame seeds and spring onion and let everyone dig in! An extra squeeze of lime juice is also a welcome addition to give an added layer of zing.

Spicy Korean chicken wings and slaw- a large stack of napkins is a must!

Advertisements

Prawn laksa


Prawn laksa hits all the right flavour notes- spicy, savoury and a hint of sweetness; surely it has to be one of the best Asian comfort foods around? Laksa is usually found in Malaysia and can include many main ingredients such as chicken or tofu- prawn is just the start or you can always mix and match! Don’t be put off by the shrimp paste or fish sauce- they are there to season and add depth so do try them. The spice paste can be made well in advance and then kept in the fridge. You may also like to make more paste than you need for one meal and then save it for another day to save some time.

This laksa includes beansprouts which are readily available in supermarkets. You may also like to include shredded vegetables such as mange tout, sugar snap peas or Asian greens- it really depends how hungry you are!

IMG_20160517_192418

Ingredients- serves 2
For the laksa paste
2 dried kashmiri chillies- soaked then chopped
1 stem of lemongrass- chopped
2 cloves of garlic
1 inch piece of fresh ginger
1 tsp shrimp paste
2 shallots- chopped
Pinch of turmeric
Salt
1/2 tbsp vegetable oil

For the rest
200g raw prawns
400ml coconut milk
200ml chicken stock made up with water
1 tbsp fish sauce
1/2 tbsp palm sugar
150g rice noodles
50g beansprouts
2 spring onions- shredded

1. Start off by soaking the kashmiri chillies whilst you prepare the remaining ingredients for the paste. Blitz into a paste or bash using a mortar and pestle if you prefer a more rustic look.

2. Take a large pan and heat the glug of vegetable oil over a medium heat. Cook off the paste for a couple of minutes until it releases its fragrance. Add the coconut milk, stock, fish sauce and palm sugar and simmer. How long I simmer this for depends on how much time I have but aim for around 10-15 minutes so the flavours from the paste has time to develop and infuse.

3. Meanwhile soak the rice noodles in boiling water, drain well and set aside. Pop the prawns into the broth to cook through whilst you divide the noodles between two deep bowls. Alternatively, and I know this is not the true way of doing it, but I also like to add the rice noodles to the broth and finish off in that so it soaks up the fragrant sauce. When the prawns are cooked, ladle the broth over the noodles before going in with the beansprouts and spring onion. I also like to fry rings of shallot to give a crispy topping.

Prawn laksa- spicy, warming, comforting and impossible to resist!

Chicken yakitori bites

Chicken yakitori is a well known Japanese dish which lends itself to enjoying with an ice cold beer in hand. It is usually cooked on skewers and grilled but I have chosen to break with tradition and cook the chunks of chicken separately on a griddle for extra caramelisation. Most recipes ask you to strain your sauce of ginger and garlic goodness however I found that you don’t need to do this as, if you are careful, the sauce won’t burn and you’re still left with a hit of those fantastic flavours.

IMG_20160329_192628

Ingredients- serves 2
250g boneless chicken thigh- cut into bite sized pieces
50ml soy sauce
30ml mirin
25ml sake
1 tbsp caster sugar
2cm piece of ginger- grated
1 garlic clove- crushed
1 tsp cornflour mixed with 1/2 tbsp water

1. Kick off by adding the soy sauce, mirin and sake together before adding in the sugar, ginger and garlic. Heat over a low heat and bring it to a simmer. Cook until the sugar has dissolved and the ginger and garlic are softening. Add the cornflour mixture and cook further until the sauce is thickened and glossy.

2. Take the sauce from the heat and allow to cool. As I say, I don’t strain the sauce as I like the ginger and garlic but you can sieve it at this stage if you like. When the sauce is cool, coat the chicken chunks with the majority of the sauce but reserve a small amount for later. Place the chicken in a covered bowl and refrigerate for at least an hour.

3. When you are ready to get cooking, warm a griddle pan to medium and cook the chunks of chicken until cooked through. This should take around 8-10 minutes depending on how large your chunks are. Halfway through cooking brush the remaining sauce over the chicken. The result should be tender and caramelised chicken. Serve with rice if you like and eat immediately. A flourish of toasted sesame seeds or crunchy shredded spring onion is also delicious.

Caramelised yakitori bites- crack open a beer and enjoy!

 

Spicy prawn noodle broth

Spicy prawn noodle soup is like a giant hug in a bowl for the soul and the stomach. It combines the sweetness of prawns, the freshness of vegetables, the lightness of broth with a punch! I made my own stock from prawn shells and a few additions as you will see however if you are short on time you could use a readymade stock but it really is worth the effort to do your own.

 IMG_20150805_192905

Ingredients- serves 2-3
For the stock

250g shell on king prawns
Litre of water
Knob of fresh ginger
4 spring onions- cut into thirds
Fresh piece of lemongrass- left whole
1 red chilli- sliced and deseeded (depending on how spicy you like it!)
1 fresh lime
2 tbsp dark soy sauce
2 tsp fish sauce
2tsp palm sugar

For the noodles
150g rice noodles
Handful of sugar snap peas- sliced on the diagonal
Handful of bamboo shoots- sliced on the diagonal
2 heads of pak choi- white parts finely sliced and leaves shredded

1. Kick off by removing the prawns from their shells. Take a large, deep saucepan and add a splash of vegetable oil and heat this over a high heat. Cook the prawn shells until they turn pink. Add a litre of water and bring to a gentle simmer. Leave this for half an hour before straining and reserving the water- you can discard the shells at this stage. Add the water back into a clean saucepan and infuse with the ginger, lemongrass and spring onion; these will all be removed later and won’t be in the final dish so sling them in and off you go! Simmer again for at least 30 minutes but longer if you can so the flavours can develop.

2. When you are nearly ready to use the stock, remove the ginger, lemongrass and spring onion and discard the prawn shells. Skim off any impurities from the surface of the stock and strain well. Now comes the time to season the stock so you must taste as you go. Add the soy sauce, fish stock and palm sugar as stated in the ingredients list but tweak to suit your tastes. Fish sauce and soy will add the salty edge the broth needs so go easy. Give a squeeze of lime to add a little acidity.

3. In a separate pan, add a splash of oil and heat over a medium heat. Add the sugar snap peas, bamboo and the white part of the pak choi. If you like a spicy broth you should add the chilli in at this stage too; if you prefer it to be milder then add it in at the end to serve. Cook the vegetables for a couple of minutes before adding the broth back into the pan. Bring it back to a simmer before adding the prawns and pak choi leaves to cook. The prawns will go blush pink when ready.

4. Meanwhile, cook the rice noodles according to packet instructions and drain well. I give mine a minute less than it suggests as it will be in the broth so you don’t want soggy noodles. Take large bowls for serving and divide the noodles between them. Ladle over the finished broth and finish with a little extra chilli or coriander if you like.

Spicy prawn noodle broth- the perfect meal for a chilly evening as autumn looms!

Chilli sesame crusted tofu

Time for another tofu post I feel in an effort to get this bean curd beauty back in vogue! This gives the tofu such a savoury hit that it goes well in rice and noodle dishes so be as creative as you want. I like to use smoked tofu to add an extra flavour dimension but plain tofu is just as delicious.

wpid-img_20150427_170638.jpg

Ingredients- serves 2
1 block of firm tofu- plain or smoked
1 egg
4 tbsp sesame seeds
2 tbsp red chilli flakes
Small pack of panko crumbs

1. Start off by blotting the tofu with kitchen towel to remove any excess moisture before cutting into bite sized pieces.

2. Crack an egg into a bowl, whisk lightly and set aside. Combine a mixture of panko crumbs, chilli and sesame and lay out on a plate. The quantities of sesame and chilli can be altered depending on your tastes but try to get a balance between the heat of the chilli, savouriness of the sesame and crunch of the crumb.

3. When you are ready, drop the tofu chunks in the egg before rolling each piece in the crumb mix. Make sure each side is well coated. Meanwhile, heat vegetable oil in a pan so it is around 3cm deep (now is not the time to walk away and leave this!) and heat. When the oil is hot enough, shallow fry the tofu in small batches so it is golden and crisp. Remove the tofu with a slotted spoon and blot on kitchen roll.

Serve immediately with your choice of rice or noodle dish.

Crispy chilli sesame tofu- a crunchy new way of trying tofu!

Aromatic Thai roasted duck legs with jasmine rice

Bring a new lease of life to duck legs! If you’re fed up with basic roasted duck then have a go at this! All the traditional Thai flavours are in this recipe which go well with the richness of the duck and freshens it up.

wpid-wp-1416052851205.jpeg

Ingredients- serves 2
2 duck legs
3 spring onions- shredded
100- 150g jasmine rice

For the marinade:
1 stick of lemongrass- finely chopped
1 lime- zested and juiced
1/2 tbsp groundnut or vegetable oil
Handful of coriander- chopped
2 shallots- finely chopped
Small piece of fresh ginger- grated or finely chopped
1 tsp soft brown sugar
1/2 tsp Thai fish sauce
1/2 tsp light soy sauce
1 /2 tsp each of ground coriander, turmeric and cumin
1 tbsp tamarind paste
2 garlic cloves- crushed
Small red chilli- deseeded and finely chopped

1. This recipe can be done on the day you want it but prepare the duck the day before if you have the time but it’s delicious either way. Place the duck legs in a bowl and add all of the marinade ingredients in with it. Combine the ingredients well and off you go! Season well and cover before leaving in the fridge overnight or for as long as you can. I have used fresh lime in the marinade to add an acidity however kaffir lime leaves would also work to infuse.

2. When ready to eat, preheat the oven to 180c/ 160 fan and place the duck legs on a baking tray or rack. Cook for around 40 minutes until the duck is cooked through and the juices run clear. Check it halfway and cover loosely with foil if it is getting a bit too golden too quickly.

3. Just before the duck is ready, cook the jasmine rice as per instructions. I like to add in 2 shredded spring onions to add extra flavour. Serve with the duck and scatter over the remaining onion and coriander. You may like to serve some other vegetables on the side such as sugar snap peas or Asian greens- or both! I like to either steam or griddle the greens with a splash of sesame oil to finish; a great accompaniment for a range of dishes!

Aromatic Thai duck legs- a sure fire hit!